Friday, October 19, 2018

Reading


Adler, Mortimer J. How to Read a Book: The Art of Getting a Liberal Education.

Ahern, Jennifer. “The Reading/Writing Connection Updated: An Annotated Bibliography.” ERIC ED 415 502 (Sept. 1998).

Anson, Chris M., et al. Scenarios for Teaching Writing: Contexts for Discussion and Reflective Practice. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English, 1993. Chapter 2, “Using Readings in Writing Courses.”

Anthony, Helene M., P. David Pearson, and Taffy E. Raphael. “Reading Comprehension: A Selected Review.” Linguistics for Teachers. Eds. Linda Miller Cleary and Michael D. Linn. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993. 282-312.

Arnold, Sarah Louise, and George Lyman Kittredge. The Mother Tongue. Book I. Lessons in Speaking, Reading and Writing English. Boston: Ginn, 1900.

Baratz, Joan C. “Teaching Reading in an Urban Negro School System.” Teaching Black Children to Read. Ed. Joan C. Baratz and Roger W. Shuy. Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics, 1969. 91-116.

Baratz, Joan C., and Roger W. Shuy, eds. Teaching Black Children to Read. Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics, 1969.

Barry, Dave. “Selling Newspapers in a Jimmy Eat World.” Miami Herald 13 October 2002. 13 October 2002.

Bartholomae, D. “The Argument of Reading.” Argument Revisited, Argument Redefined. Ed. Barbara Emmel. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1996.

Bartholomae, David, and Anthony Petrosky. Facts, Artifacts and Counterfacts: Theory and Method for a Reading and Writing Course. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton, 1986.

Bartholomae, David. “Inventing the University.” When a Writer Can’t Write: Studies in Writer’s Block and Other Composing Problems. Ed. Mike Rose. New York: Guilford, 1985. 134-165. Rpt. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory. Ed. Victor Villanueva, Jr. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English, 1997. 589-620.

Bartholomae, David. “Producing Adult Readers: 1930-50.” The Right to Literacy. Ed. Andrea A. Lunsford, Helene Moglen, and James Slevin. New York: MLA, 1990.

Bazerman, Charles. The Informed Reader: Contemporary Issues in the Disciplines. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1989. p. 7, “How to Write Reading Journals.”

Birkets, Sven. The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age. New York: Faber and Faber, 1994.

Bleich, David. The Double Perspective: Language, Literacy, and Social Relations. New York: Oxford UP, 1988.

Boyarin, Jonathan, ed. The Ethnography of Reading. U California P, 1993.

Brandt, Deborah. “Remembering Writing, Remembering Reading.” College Composition and Communication 45.4 (December 1994): 459-79.

Brent, Doug.  Reading as Rhetorical Invention: Knowledge, Persuasion, and the Teaching of Research-Based Writing. 1992.

Brodkey, Linda. “Modernism and the Scene(s) of Writing.” College English 49.4 (April 1987): 396-418.

Brooks, Greg, A.K. Pugh, and Nigel Hall, eds. Further Studies in the History of Reading. Widnes: United Kingdom Reading Association Office, 1993.

Brummett, Barry. Techniques of Close Reading. Los Angeles, CA: Sage, 2010.

Bunn, Michael. “Motivation and Connection: Teaching Reading (and Writing) in the Composition Classroom.” College Composition and Communication 64.3 (Feb. 2013): 496-516.

Calinescu, Matei. Rereading. Yale UP, 1993.

Carillo, Ellen. Securing a Place for Reading in Composition. Utah State UP, 2015.

Carr, Nicholas. “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” The Atlantic July-Aug. 2008.

Carr, Nicholas. The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains. Norton, 2011.

Cave, Terence. “The Mimesis of Reading in the Renaissance.” Mimesis: From Mirror to Method, Augustine to Descartes. Ed. John D. Lyons and Stephen G. Nichols, Jr. Hanover, NH: UP of New England, 1982. 149-65.

Caws, Mary Ann, ed. Textual Analysis: Some Readers Reading. Ed.. New York: Modern Language Association, 1987.

Chaplin, Miriam L. “The Evolution of a Course.” Conference on College Composition and Communication. Boston, 21 March 1991.

Chast, Robin. “Shelved.” Cover art, New Yorker 18 Oct. 2010. Print.

Clark, Gregory. Dialogue, Dialectic, and Conversation Perspective on the Function of Writing. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP.

Clifford, John, ed. The Experience of Reading: Louise Rosenblatt and Reader-Response Theory. Boynton/Cook, 1990.

Comprone, Joseph J. “Recent Research in Reading and Its Implications for the College Composition Curriculum.” Rhetoric Review 1 (1983): 122-137. Rpt. Landmark Essays on Advanced Composition. Ed. Gary A. Olson and Julie Drew. Mahwah, NJ: Hermagoras Press, 1996. 163-176.

Cullinan, Bernice E. “Independent Reading and School Achievement.” School Library Media Research 3 (2000).

Cunningham, Anne E., and Keith E. Stanovich. “What Reading Does for the Mind.” American Educator (Spring/Summer 1998): 1-8.

Davidson, Cathy N., ed. Reading in America: Literature and Social History. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins UP, 1989.

DeMaria, Robert, Jr. Samuel Johnson and the Life of Reading. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1996.

Dickstein, Morris. “Damaged Literacy: The Decay of Reading.” Profession 93 (1993): 34-40.

Downing, David B. “Beyond Disciplinary English: Integrating Reading and Writing by Reforming Academic Labor.” Beyond English Inc.: Curricular Reform in a Global Economy. Eds. David B. Downing, Claude Mark Hurlbert, and Paula Mathieu. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2002. 23-38.

Early, Margaret, and Bonnie O. Ericson. “The Act of Reading.” Linguistics for Teachers. Eds. Linda Miller Cleary and Michael D. Linn. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993. 313-324.

Earthman, Elise Ann. “Creating the Virtual Work: Readers’ Processes in Understanding Literary Texts.” Research in the Teaching of English 26.4 (December 1992): 351-84.

Edmundson, Mark. Why Read? New York: Bloomsbury, 2004.

Evans, Rick. “Learning ‘Schooled Literacy’: The Literate Life Histories of Mainstream Student Readers and Writers.” Discourse Processes 16.3 (July-September 1993): 317-40.

Fahnestock, Jeanne. “Connection and Understanding.” Constructing Rhetorical Education. Ed. Marie Secor and Davida Charney. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1992. 235-56.

Fasold, Ralph W. “Orthography in Reading Materials for Black English Speaking Children.” Teaching Black Children to Read. Ed. Joan C. Baratz and Roger W. Shuy. Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics, 1969. 68-91.

Flesch, Rudolf. Why Johnny Can’t Read: And What You Can Do about It. Harper/Collins.

Flitterman-King, Sharon. “The Role of the Response Journal in Active Reading.” The Quarterly of the National Writing Project and the Center for the Study of Writing 10 (1988): 4-11.

Foster, David. “Reading(s) in the Writing Classroom.” College Composition and Communication 48.4 (December 1997): 518-539.

Flower, Linda. “The Construction of Purpose in Writing and Reading.” College English 50 (1988): 528-50.

Flynn, Elizabeth A., and Patrocinio Schweickart, eds. Gender and Reading. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1986.

Foucault, Michel. “What Is an Author?” Language, Countermemory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Trans. Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1977. 113-38.

Gallop, Jane. “The Historicization of Literary Studies and the Fate of Close Reading.” Profession 2007: 181-186.

Gardiner, Ellen. “Peter Elbow’s Rhetoric of Reading.” Rhetoric Review 13.2 (Spring 1995): 321-30.

Garner, Ruth, and Patricia A. Alexander, eds. Beliefs about Text and Instruction with Text. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 1994.

Gavrilov, A. K. “Techniques of Reading in Classical Antiquity.” Classical Quarterly 47.1 (1997).

Geisler, Cheryl. Academic Literacy and the Nature of Expertise: Reading, Writing, and Knowing in Academic Philosophy. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum, 1994.

Genung, John Franklin. The Working Principles of Rhetoric. Boston: Ginn, 1901.

Gibson, Walker. “Authors, Speakers, Readers, and Mock Readers.” College English 11 (February 1950): 265-9. Rpt. Reader-Response Criticism: From Formalism to Post-Structuralism. Ed. Jane P. Tompkins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1980. 1-6.

Goodman, Kenneth S. “Dialect Barriers to Reading Comprehension.” Teaching Black Children to Read. Ed. Joan C. Baratz and Roger W. Shuy. Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics, 1969. 14-28.

Goodman, Yetta. “I Never Read Such a Long Story Before.” Linguistics for Teachers. Eds. Linda Miller Cleary and Michael D. Linn. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993. 325-336.

Greene, Stuart. “Mining Texts in Reading to Write.” Journal of Advanced Composition 12.1 (Winter 1992): 151-70.

Griffiths, Paul J. Religious Reading: the Place of Reading in the Practice of Religion. Oxford UP.

Haas, Christina, and Linda Flower. “Rhetorical Reading Strategies and the Construction of Meaning.” College Composition and Communication 39 (May 1988): 167-84.

Halasek, Kay. “Feminism and Bakhtin: Dialogic Reading in the Academy.” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 22.1 (Winter 1992): 63-74.

Hansson, Gunnar. “Readers RespondingÑand Then?” Research in the Teaching of English 26.2 (May 1992): 135-48.

Harrington, Dana. “Composition, Literature, and the Emergence of Modern Reading Practices.” Rhetoric Review 15.2 (Spring 1997): 249-263.

Harris, Jeanette. Expressive Discourse. Dallas, TX: Southern Methodist UP, 1990. Reader’s construction of text.

Harris, Joseph. “The Other Reader.” Journal of Advanced Composition 12.1 (Winter 1992): 27-38.

Hartman, Geoffrey H. “The Fate of Reading Once More.” PMLA 111 (1996): 383-89.

Hashimoto, Irvin. “The Myth of the Attention-Getting Opener.” Written Communication 3 (1986): 123-31.

Helmers, Marguerite, ed. Intertexts: Reading Pedagogy in College Writing Classrooms. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2003.

Herrington, Anne, and Charles Moran. “What Happens When Machines Read Our Students’ Writing? College English 63.4 (March 2001): 480-499.

Hollander, John. “Reading as Was Never Read.” ADE Bulletin 98 (Spring 1991): 7-13.

Horning, Alice S. “Reading across the Curriculum as the Key to Student Success.” Across the Disciplines 4 (2007). 29 Sept. 2007 .

Huckin, Thomas, and Linda Flower. “Reading for Points and Purposes.” Journal of Advanced Composition 11.2 (Fall 1991): 347-62.

Hull, Glynda, and Mike Rose. “‘This Wooden Shack Place’: The Logic of an Unconventional Reading.” College Composition and Communication 41 (October 1990): 287-98.

International Reading Association publishes an annual bibliography.

Jackson, Leon. “The Reader Retailored: Thomas Carlyle, His American Audiences, and the Politics of Evidence.” Book History 2 (1999).

Jamieson, Sandra. “Reading and Engaging Sources: What Students’ Use of Sources Reveals about Advanced Reading Skills.” Across the Disciplines 10.4 (2013).

Jamieson, Sandra, and Rebecca Moore Howard. “Sentence-Mining: Uncovering the Amount of Reading and Reading Comprehension in College Writers’ Researched Writing.” The New Digital Scholar: Exploring and Enriching the Research and Writing Practices of NextGen Students. Ed. Randall McClure and James Purdy. Information Today, 2013. 109-131.

Johnson, Steven. “Dawn of the Digital Natives.” The Guardian 7 Feb. 2008.

Jolliffe, David. “Finding Yourself in the Text: The Role of Identity Formation in Learning to Read in Academic Disciplines.” Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York. 22 October 2002. [file: Literacy]

Jolliffe, David. “Who Is Teaching Composition Students to Read and How Are They Doing It? ” Composition Studies 31.1 (Spring 2003): 127-142.

Jones, Edward S. Improvement of Study Habits: Including Approved Techniques of Studying in College. Buffalo NY: Foster & Stewart, 1934, 1945.

Labov, William. “Some Sources of Reading Problems for Negro Speakers of Nonstandard English.” Teaching Black Children to Read. Ed. Joan C. Baratz and Roger W. Shuy. Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics, 1969. 29-67.

Langer, Judith A. “The Process of Understanding: Reading for Literary and Informative Purposes.” Research in the Teaching of English 24 (October 1990): 229-60.

Levy, Andrew. “Frederick Douglass, Benjamin Franklin, and the Trickster Reader.” College English 52 (November 1990): 743-55.

Long, Elizabeth. “Women, Reading, and Cultural Authority: Some Implications of the Audience Perspective in Cultural Studies.” American Quarterly 38 (Fall 1986): 591-612.

Long, Elizabeth. “Textual Interpretation as Collective Action.” The Ethnography of Reading. Ed. Jonathan Boyarin. Berkeley: U of California P, 1992. 180-211.

Luke, Allan, and C. Walton. ” Critical Reading: Teaching and Assessing.” International Encyclopedia of Education. 2nd ed. Ed. T. Husen and T. Postlethwaite. Oxford, UK: Pergamon, 1994. 1194-1198.

Manguel, Alberto. A History of Reading. New York: HarperCollins, 1996.

McCormick, Kathleen. “Theory in the Reader: Bleich, Holland, and Beyond.” CE 47, No. 8 (December 1985), pp. 836ff.

McCracken, Ellen. “Metaplagiarism and the Critic’s Role as Detective: Ricardo Piglia’s Reinvention of Roberto Arlt.” PMLA 106.5 (October 1991): 1071-82.

McDowell, Kathleen. “Toward a History of Children as Readers, 1890-1930.” Book History 12 (2009): 240-265.

McGregor, Graham, and R.S. White. Reception and Response: Hearer Creativity and the Analysis of Spoken and Written Texts. Routledge, 1990.

McDavid, Raven I., Jr. “Dialectology and the Teaching of Reading.” Teaching Black Children to Read. Ed. Joan C. Baratz and Roger W. Shuy. Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics, 1969. 1-13.

Meutsch, Dietrich, and Reinhold Viehoff, eds. Comprehension of Literary Discourse: Results and Problems of Interdisciplinary Approaches. 1989.

Minock, Mary. “Toward a Postmodern Pedagogy of Imitation.” JAC 15.3 (1995): 489-510.

Monaghan, E. Jennifer, and E. Wendy Saul. “The Reader, the Scribe, the Thinker: A Critical Look at the History of American Reading and Writing Instruction.” The Formation of School Subjects: The Struggle for Creating an American Institution. Ed. Thomas S. Popkewitz. New York, 1987. 85-122.

Montgomery, Martin, et al. Ways of Reading. New York: Routledge, 1992.

Morrow, Nancy. “The Role of Reading in the Composition Classroom.” JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory 17.3 (1997): 453-472.

Murray, D.M. “Teaching the Other Self: The Writer’s First Reader.” College Composition and Communication 33 (1982): 140-7.

Murray, Heather. “Close Reading, Closed Writing.” College English 53.2 (February 1991): 195-208.

National Endowment for the Arts. To Read or Not to Read: A Question of National Consequence. 2007.

Nelson, Nancy. “The Reading-Writing Nexus in Discourse Research.” Handbook of Research on Writing. Ed. Charles Bazerman. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2008. 435-450.

Newkirk, Thomas, ed. Only Connect; Uniting Reading and Writing. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1986.

Nichols, John G. “Ezra Pound’s Poetic Anthologies and the Architecture of Reading.” PMLA 121.1 (Jan. 2006): 170-185.

Panek, Mark. “Active Reading in the Multicultural Composition Classroom.” Composition Studies 32.1 (Spring 2004): 49-72.

Penrose, Ann M., and Cheryl Geisler. “Reading and Writing Without Authority.” College Composition and Communication 45.4 (December 1994): 505-20.

Petersen, Bruce T., et al. “Investigative Reading and Writing: Responding to Reading with Research.” College Composition and Communication 37 (1986): 236-40.

Peterson, Bruce T. “Writing about Responses: A Unified Model of Reading, Interpretation, and Composition.” College English 44 (1982): 459-68.

Price, Leah. “Reading: The State of the Discipline.” Book History 7 (2004).

Purves, Alan C. “Language Processing: Reading and Writing.” Rev. of Language Processing and the Reading of Literature: Toward a Model of Comprehension and Constructing Texts: Elements of a Theory of Composition and Style, by George Dillon. College English 45 (1983): 129-40.

Raven, James, Helen Small, and Naomi Tradmor, eds. The Practice and Representation of Reading in England. New York: Cambridge UP, 1996.

“Reading at Risk: A Survey of Literary Reading in America.” National Endowment for the Arts, July 2004.

Reynolds, Suzanne. Medieval Reading: Grammar, Rhetoric, and the Classical Text. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1996.

Ritchie, Joy S. “Resistance to Reading: Another View of the Minefield.” Journal of Advanced Composition 12.1 (Winter 1992): 117-36.

Roth, Phyllis A. “Re-Viewing Reading and Writing Assignments.” The Writer’s Mind: Writing as a Mode of Thinking. Eds. Janice N. Hays, Phyllis A. Roth, Jon R. Ramsey, and Robert D. Foulke. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English, 1983. 210-220.

Ruddell, R., and Boyle, O. (1984, Apr). “A Study of the Effects of Cognitive Mapping on Reading Comprehension and Written Protocols.” ERIC ED 252 811.

Salvatori, Mariolina. “The ‘Argument of Reading’ in the Teaching of Composition.” Argument Revisited, Argument Redefined. Ed. Barbara Emmel. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1996.

Salvatori, Mariolina. “Conversations with Texts.” College English 58.4 (April 1996): 440-454.

Scharer, Patricia L. “Teachers in Transition: An Exploration of Changes in Teachers and Classrooms During Implementation of Literature-Based Reading Instruction.” Research in the Teaching of English 26.4 (December 1992): 408-45.

Scholes, Robert. Protocols of Reading. New Haven, CT: Yale UP, 1989.

Schweickart, Patrocinio P. “Reading Ourselves: Toward a Feminist Theory of Reading.” Gender and Reading. Ed. Elizabeth A. Flynn and Patrocinio Schweickart. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1986. 30-62.

Shanahan, Timothy. “Relations among Oral Language, Reading, and Writing Development.” Handbook of Writing Research. Ed. Charles A. MacArthur, Steve Graham, and Jill Fitzgerald. New York: Gilford, 2006. 171-186.

Shannon, Patrick. Broken Promises: Reading Instruction in Twentieth-Century America. New York: Bergin & Garvey, 1989.

Shuy, Roger W. “A Linguistic Background for Developing Beginning Reading Materials for Black Children.” Teaching Black Children to Read. Ed. Joan C. Baratz and Roger W. Shuy. Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics, 1969. 117-37.

Sims, Rudine. “Dialect and Reading: Toward Redefining the Issues.” Reader Meets Author/Bridging the Gap: A Psycholinguistic and Sociolinguistic Approach. Ed. Judith A. Langer and M. Tricia Smith-Burke. Newark, DE: International Reading Association, 1982. 222-32.

Slevin, James F. “Reading and Writing in the Classroom and the Profession.” Writing Theory and Critical Theory. Ed. John Clifford and John Schilb. New York: Modern Language Association, 1994. 53-72.

Sosnoski, James. “Hyper-Readers and their Reading Engines.” Passions, Pedagogies and 21st Century Technologies. Ed. Gail E. Hawisher and Cynthia L. Selfe. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English, 1999. 161-177.

Spitta, Silvia. “The Contingencies of Life and Reading: Para Gloria.” PMLA 121.1 (Jan. 2006): 292-294.

Spivey, N. “Construing Constructivism: Reading Research in the United States.” Poetics 16 (1987): 169-92.

Squire, James R. The Responses of Adolescents While Reading Four Short Stories.

Stauffer, R. Teaching Reading as a Thinking Process. New York: Harper, 1969.

Stevenson, Harold. “Children’s Problems in Learning to Read Chinese, Japanese, and English.” The Future of Literacy in a Changing World. Ed. Daniel A. Wagner. Rev. ed. Cresskill, NJ: Hampden P, 1999. 151-174.

Stewart, William A. “On the Use of Negro Dialect in the Teaching of Reading.” Teaching Black Children to Read. Ed. Joan C. Baratz and Roger W. Shuy. Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics, 1969. 156-219.

Stock, Brian. Augustine the Reader: Meditation, Self-Knowledge, and the Ethics of Interpretation. Cambridge, MA: Belknap, 1996.

Striphas, Ted. The Late Age of Print: Everyday Book Culture from Consumerism to Control. Columbia UP, 2009.

Sutherland-Smith, Wendy. “Weaving the Literacy Web: Changes in Reading from Page to Screen.” The ReadingTeacher 55.7 (Apr. 2002): 662-669. JSTOR. Web.

Svenbro, Jesper. Phrasikleia: An Anthropology of Reading in Ancient Greece. Trans. Janet Lloyd. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1993.

Teale, Wiliam H., and Elizabeth Sulzby,. “Literacy Acquisition in Early Childhood: The Roles of Access and Mediation in Storybook Reading.” The Future of Literacy in a Changing World. Ed. Daniel A. Wagner. Rev. ed. Cresskill, NJ: Hampden P, 1999. 131-150.

“To Read or Not to Read: A Question of National Consequence.” National Endowment for the Arts, Nov. 2007.

Travis, Molly Abel. Reading Cultures: The Construction of Readers in the Twentieth Century. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1998.

Troyka, Lynn Quitman. “Closeness to Text: A Delineation of Reading Processes as They Affect Composing.” Only Connect; Uniting Reading and Writing. Ed. Thomas Newkirk. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1986. 187-97.

Troyka, Lynn Quitman. “The Writer as Conscious Reader.” A Sourcebook for Basic Writing Teachers. Ed. Theresa Enos. NY: Random House, 1987. 307-317.

van den Broek, Paul, and Kathleen E. Kremer. “The Mind in Action: What It Means to Comprehend During Reading.” Reading for Meaning: Fostering Comprehension in the Middle Grades. Eds. Barbara M. Taylor, Michael F. Graves, and Paul van den Broek. New York: Teachers College Press, 2000.

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Waters, Lindsay. “Time for Reading.” Chronicle of Higher Education 9 Feb. 2007: B6-8.

Wilkens, Matthew. “Canons, Close Reading, and the Evolution of Method.” Debates in the Digital Humanities. Ed. Matthew K. Gold. U Minnesota P, 2012. 249-258.

Wineburg, Samuel S. “The Cognitive Representation of Historical Texts.” Teaching and Learning in History. ed. Gaea Leinhardt, Isabel L. Beck, and Catherine Stainton. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 1994. 85-135.

Wolfram, Walter A., and Ralph W. Fasold. “Toward Reading Materials for Speakers of Black English: Three Linguistically Appropriate Passages.” Teaching Black Children to Read. Ed. Joan C. Baratz and Roger W. Shuy. Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics, 1969. 138-55.

Wollman-Bonilla, Julie E. “Why Don’t They ‘Just Speak?’ Attempting Literature Discussion with More and Less Able Readers.” Research in the Teaching of English 28.3 (October 1994): 231-58.

Zinn, Robert L. Speed Reading. Harper/Collins, 1991.

Zwann, Rolf A. Aspects of Literary Comprehension: A Cognitive Approach. Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1993.