Thursday, July 19, 2018

Style and Stylistics, Sentence Combining, T-Units


See also: Style models

Abrams, M.H. The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical Tradition. New York: W.W. Norton, 1953.

Addison, Joseph. “Characteristics of Taste.” The Works of the Right Honorable Joseph Addison. Ed. Richard Hurd. Vol. 3. London: George Bell, 1884. 387-393.

Agnew, Lois. “The Civic Function of Taste: A Re-Assessment of Hugh Blair’s Rhetorical Theory.” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 28.2 (Spring 1998): 25-36.

Amare, Nicole.  “Style:  The New Grammar in Composition Studies?” Refiguring Prose Style:  Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy.  Ed. T.R. Johnson and Tom Pace.  Logan:  Utah State UP, 2005.  153-166.

Annas, Pamela J.  “Style as Politics:  A Feminist Approach to the Teaching of Writing.”  College English 47 (1985).  Rpt. Feminism and Composition:  A Critical Sourcebook.  Ed. Gesa E. Kirsch, Faye Spencer Maor, Lance Massey, Lee Nickoson-Massey, and Mary P, Sheridan-Rabideau, eds.  Boston:  Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2003.  61-72.

Anson, Chris M., et al. Scenarios for Teaching Writing: Contexts for Discussion and Reflective Practice. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English, 1993. Chapter 4, “Teaching ‘Grammar,’ Usage, and Style in Context.”

Aragon, Louis. Treatise on Style. Trans. Alyson Waters. Lincoln: U Nebraska P, 1991.

Aronowitz, Stanley. Postmodern Education.

Atherton, Catherine.  The Stoics on Ambiguity.  New York:  Cambridge UP, 1993.

Attridge, Derek. “Closing Statement: Linguistics and Poetics in Retrospect.” The Linguistics of Writing. Ed. N. Fabb, et al. Manchester UP, 1987. Rpt. The Stylistics Reader: From Roman Jakobson to the Present. Ed. Jean Jacques Weber. New York: St. Martin’s, 1996. 36-55.

Austin, John L. How to Do Things With Words. Oxford UP, 1962.

Baird, Lisa.  “Balancing Thought and Expression:  A Short Course in Style.” Refiguring Prose Style:  Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy.  Ed. T.R. Johnson and Tom Pace.  Logan:  Utah State UP, 2005.  167-180.

Baker, Sheridan. The Essayist. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1963.

Baker, Sheridan. The Practical Stylist with Readings and Handbook. New York: Longman, 1998.

Bakhtin, M.M. Discourse on the Novel.

Baldwin, Charles Sears.  The Expository Paragraph and Sentence.  New York:  Longmans, Green, 1897.

Bally, Charles. Traité de Stylistique Française. 3rd ed. Paris: Klincksieck.

Barnard, Ian. “The Ruse of Clarity.” College Composition and Communication 61.3 (Feb. 2010): 434-451.

Barthes, Roland. Elements of Semiology. London: Cape, 1964, 1967.

Barthes, Roland. S/Z. Paris: Seuil, 1970.

Barthes, Roland. “Style and its Image.” Literary Style: A Symposium. Ed. Seymour Chatman and Samuel R. Levin. London: Oxford UP, 1971. 5.

Barthes, Roland. Writing Degree Zero. 1952. New York: Hill & Wang, 1968.
Bazerman, Charles. “An Essay on Pedagogy by Mikhail M. Bakhtin.” Written Communication 22 (2005): 333-338.

Bender, John, and David E. Wellbery. “Rhetoricality: On the Modernist Return of Rhetoric.” The Ends of Rhetoric. Ed. John Bender and David E. Wellbery. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1990. 3-39.

Bennett, James R. A Bibliography of Stylistics and Related Criticism, 1967-83. New York: MLA, 1986.

Berke, Jacqueline.  Twenty Questions for the Writer.  New York:  Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1976, 1985.

Birch, David. “‘Working Effects with Words’–Whose Words?: Stylistics and Reader Intertextuality.” Language, Discourse and Literature. Ed. R. Carter and P. Simpson. Routledge, 1989. Rpt. The Stylistics Reader: From Roman Jakobson to the Present. Ed. Jean Jacques Weber. New York: St. Martin’s, 1996. 206-23.

Bishop, Wendy, ed. Elements of Alternate Style: Essays on Writing and Revision. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann-Boynton/Cook, 1997.

Bishop, Wendy. “Places to Stand: The Reflective Writer-Teacher-Writer in Composition.” College Composition and Communication 51.1 (September 1999): 9-31.

Blair, Hugh D. D. Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres. Vols 1 and 2. Ed. H.F. Harding and foreword by David Potter. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1965.

Blakesley, David.  “Reconceptualizing Grammar as an Aspect of Rhetorical Invention.”  The Place of Grammar in Writing Instruction.  Ed. Susan Hunter and Ray Wallace.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 1995.  191-203.

Bogiatzis, Demetris. “Style Revisited: The Dialectics of Established and Ad Hoc Usage in European Aesthetics.”  Advances in the History of Rhetoric 7 (204): 87-109.

Bond, Charles A.  “A New Approach to Freshman Composition:  A Trial of the Christensen Method.”  College English 33 (1972):  623-627.

Booth, Wayne. The Rhetoric of Fiction. Chicago UP, 1961.

Bowden, Darsie. The Mythology of Voice. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann Boynton/Cook, 1999.

Bradford, Richard. Stylistics. New York: Routledge, 1997.

Britton, James, Tony Burgess, Nancy Martin, Alex McLeod, and Harold Rosen.  The Development of Writing Abilities (11-18).  Urbana:  National Council of Teachers of English, 1975.

Broadhead, Glenn J., and James A. Berlin.  “Twelve Steps to Using Generative Sentences and Sentence Combining in the Composition Classroom.”  College Composition and Communication 32 (1981):  295-307.

Brewster, W.T. Representative Essays on the Theory of Style. New York: Macmillan, 1905.

Brody, Miriam. Manly Writing: Gender, Rhetoric, and the Rise of Composition. Southern Illinois UP, 1993. Chapter 5, “The Gendered Aesthetics of Enlightenment Rhetoric,” 72-92.

Brooks, Cleanth. The Well Wrought Urn. 1947.

Brooks, Cleanth, and Robert Penn Warren. Understanding Poetry. 1938.

Brostoff, Ania.  “Coherence:  ‘Next to’ Is Not ‘Connected to.'”  College Composition and Communication 32 (1981):  278-294.

Brown, Keith, and Jim Miller.  Syntax.  2nd ed.  New York:  Routledge, 1992.

Brown, Marshall. “Le Style est l’Homme Méme: The Action of Literature.” College English 59.7 (November 1997): 801-9.

Brown, Marshall. “Why Style Matters: The Lessons of Taine’s History of English Literature.” Turning Points: Essays in the History of Cultural Expressions. Stanford, CA: Stanford UP, 1997. 33-87.

Bullions, Peter.  A Practical Grammar of the English Language;  with Analysis of Sentences.  Rev. ed.  New York:  Sheldon, 1862, 1875.

Burroughs, John.  Literary Values and Other Papers.  Boston:  Houghton Mifflin, 1902.

Burton, Deirdre. “Through Glass Darkly: Through Dark Glasses.” Language and Literature. Ed. R. Carter. Routledge, 1982. Rpt. The Stylistics Reader: From Roman Jakobson to the Present. Ed. Jean Jacques Weber. New York: St. Martin’s, 1996. 224-40.

Butler, Christopher S., ed. Computers and Written Texts. Cambridge: Blackwell, 1992.

Butler, Paul. Out of Style. Utah State UP, 2008.

Butler, Paul. “Style in the Diaspora of Composition Studies.” Rhetoric Review 26.1 (2007): 5-24.

Butler, Paul, ed. Style in Rhetoric and Composition: A Critical Sourcebook. Bedford St. Martins, 2009.

Campbell, George. The Philosophy of Rhetoric. 1776. Ed. Lloyd Bitzer. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1963.

Carpenter, Ronald H. History as Rhetoric: Style, Narrative, and Persuasion. Columbia: U South Carolina P, 1995.

Carpenter, William J.  “Rethinking Stylistic Analysis in the Writing Class.” Refiguring Prose Style:  Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy.  Ed. T.R. Johnson and Tom Pace.  Logan:  Utah State UP, 2005.181-197.

Carter, Ronald. “Study Strategies in the Teaching of Literature to Foreign Students.” Literature and Language Teaching. Ed. C.J. Brumfit and R.A. Carter. Oxford UP, 1986. Rpt. The Stylistics Reader: From Roman Jakobson to the Present. Ed. Jean Jacques Weber. New York: St. Martin’s, 1996. 149-57.

Catano, James V. “Stylistics.” The Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory & Criticism. Ed. Michael Groden and Martin Kreiswirth. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins UP, 1997. Online. Available http://www.press.jhu.edu/books/guide.

Cautrell, Dion C.  “Rhetor-Fitting:  Defining Ethics Through Style.” Refiguring Prose Style:  Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy.  Ed. T.R. Johnson and Tom Pace.  Logan:  Utah State UP, 2005.  228-240.

Chatman, Seymour. “New Ways of Analyzing Narrative Structure.” Language and Style 2 (1969): 3-36.

Chatman, Seymour. Story and Discourse. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1978.

Chatman, Seymour, and Samuel R. Levin, eds. Literary Style: A Symposium. London: Oxford UP, 1971. (Includes Michel Riffaterre, “Criteria for Style Analysis,” 442-50.)

Christensen, Francis, and Bonniejean Christensen.  A New Rhetoric.  New York:  Harper & Row, 1976.

Christensen, Francis.  “A Generative Rhetoric of the Sentence.”  College Composition and Communication 14 (1963):  155-161.  Rpt. Rhetoric and Composition: A Sourcebook for Teachers and Writers. Ed. Richard L. Graves. 3rd ed. Heinemann Boynton/Cook, 1990. 191-199.

Christensen, Francis.  “The Course in Advanced Composition for Teachers.”  College Composition and Communication  24 (1973):  163-170.

Christensen, Francis.  “The Problem of Defining a Mature Style.”  English Journal 57.4 (April 1968).

Christensen, Francis.  Notes toward a New Rhetoric:  Six Essays for Teachers.  2nd ed.  New York:  Harper & Row, 1967, 1978.

Clark, Matthew.  A Matter of Style.  New York:  Oxford UP, 2002.

Clements, Peter.  “Re-Placing the Sentence:  Approaching Style Through Genre.” Refiguring Prose Style:  Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy.  Ed. T.R. Johnson and Tom Pace.  Logan:  Utah State UP, 2005.  198-214.

College Composition and Communication, special issue, February 1983.

Combs, Warren E.  “Sentence-Combining Practice:  Do Gains in Judgments of Writing ‘Quality’ Persist?”  Journal of Educational Research 70 (1977):  318-321.

Combs, Warren E., and William L. Smith.  “The Effects of Overt and Covert Cues on Written Syntax.”  Research in the Teaching of English 14 (1980):  19-38.

Conley, Tom. “From Multiplicities to Folds: On Style and Form in Deleuze.” South Atlantic Quarterly 96.3 (Summer 1997).

Connors, Robert J.  “The Erasure of the Sentence.”  College Composition and Communication 52.1 (September 2000):  96-128.

Connors, Robert , and Cheryl Glenn.  The New St. Martin’s Guide to Teaching Writing.  Boston:  Bedford/St. Martin’s, 1999.

Connors, Robert J. “Static Abstractions and Composition.” Freshman English News 12 (Spring 1983): 1-4, 9-12. Rpt. The Writing Teacher’s Sourcebook. Ed. Gary Tate, Edward P.J. Corbett, and Nancy Myers. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford UP, 1994. 279-93.

Cooper, Lane. Theories of Style. New York: Macmillan, 1907.

Corbett, Edward P.J. “Approaches to the Study of Style.” Teaching Composition: Twelve Bibliographical Essays. Ed. Gary Tate. Rev. ed. Fort Worth: Texas Christian UP, 1987: 83-130.

Cox, Sidney. Indirections for Those Who Want to Write. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1947.

Crowhurst, Marion.  “Cohesion in Argument and Narration at Three Grade Levels.”  Research in the Teaching of English 21 (1987):  185-201.

Crowhurst, Marion.  “On the Misinterpretation of Syntactic Complexity Data.”  English Education 99 (1979): 91-97.

Crowhurst, Marion.  “Sentence Combining:  Maintaining Realistic Expectations.”  College Composition and Communication 34.1 (February 1983):  62-72.

Crowley, Sharon. “Linguistics and Composition Instruction: 1950-1980.” Written Communication 6 (October 1989): 480-505.

Culler, Jonathan. Structuralist Poetics. London: Routledge, 1975.

Cunningham, J.V. The Problem of Style. Greenwich, CT: Fawcett, 1966.

D’Angelo, Frank J.  “The Sentence.”  Research in Composition and Rhetoric.  Ed. Michael G. Moran and Ronald F. Lunsford.  Westport, CT:  Greenwood P, 1984.  303-317.

D’Angelo, Frank J. “Style as Structure.” Style 8.1 (1974): 322-364.

Daiker, Donald A., Andrew Kerek, and Max Morenberg, eds.  Sentence-Combining:  A Rhetorical Perspective.”  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 1985.

Daiker, Donald A., Andrew Kerek, and Max Morenberg, eds.  Sentence-Combining and the Teaching of Writing.  Conway, AR:  L&S Books, 1979.

Daiker, Donald A., Andrew Kerek, and Max Morenberg.  “Sentence-Combining and Syntactic Maturity in Freshman English.”  College Composition and Communication 29 (1978):  36-41.

Daiker, Donald A., Andrew Kerek, and Max Morenberg.  The Writer’s Options:  Combining to Composing.  4th ed.  New York:  Harper & Row, 1979, 1982, 1986, 1990.

Daniel, Neil, and Christina Murphy. “Correctness or Clarity? Finding Answers in the Classroom and the Professional World.” The Place of Grammar in Writing Instruction. Ed. Susan Hunter and Ray Wallace. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1995. 225-242.

Demetrius. On Style. Trans. G.M.A. Grube. U Toronto P, 1961.

Demetrius. On Style. Trans. and intro. John Warrington. New York: Dutton, 1963. 61-133.

Dillon, George. Constructing Texts: Elements of a Theory of Composition and Style. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1981.

Dillon, George. “Whorfian Stylistics.” Journal of Literary Semantics 11 (1982): 73-77.

Dionysius of Halicarnassus. “On Composition.” The Critical Essays. Trans. Stephen Usher. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1974-85.

DiTiberio, John K., and George H. Jensen. Writing and Personality: Finding Your Voice, Your Style, Your Way. Palo Alto, CA: Davies Black, 1995.

Dobrée, Bonamy. Modern Prose Style. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1934.
Preface. Introduction. Part I: Descriptive Prose. 1. Description of Action (Narrative). 2. Description of People. 3. Description of Things. Part II: Explanatory Prose. 1. Science. 2. Law. 3. Philosophy. 4. Morals. 5. Theology. 6. Political Science. 7. History. 8. Criticism. Part III: Emotive Prose. 1. Rousing the Emotions. Part IV: Modern Prose Style. 1. The New Way of Writing. 2. Experiments. Appendix. Alphabetical List of Modern Authors Quoted.

Dowst, Kenneth.  “An Epistemic View of Sentence-Combining:  Practice and Theories.”  Sentence-Combining:  A Rhetorical Perspective.  Ed. Donald A. Daiker, Andrew Kerek, and Max Morenberg.  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 1985.  321-333.

Duffy, Edward.  “Sentences in Harry Potter, Students in Future Writing Classes.”  Rhetoric Review 21.2 (2002):  170-187.

Duranti, Alessandro, and Charles Goodwin, eds. Rethinking Context. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1982.

Dyer, Gary. British Satire and the Politics of Style, 1789-1832. New York: Cambridge UP, 1997.

Ehrlich, Susan. Point of View: A Linguistic Analysis of Literary Style. Routledge, 1990.

Elbow, Peter.  “The Cultures of Literature and Composition:  What Could Each Learn from the Other?”  College English 64.5 (May 2002):  533-546.
Eliot, T.S. For Lancelot Andrewes: Essays on Style and Order. Garden City: Doubleday, 1929.

Elbow, Peter.  “The Challenge for Sentence Combining.”  Sentence-Combining:  A Rhetorical Perspective.  Ed. Donald A. Daiker, Andrew Kerek, and Max Morenberg.  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 1985.  232-245.

Elbow, Peter.  “Reflections on Academic Discourse:  How It Relates to Freshmen and Colleagues.”  College English 53 (February 1991):  135-155.

Empson, William. Seven Types of Ambiguity. 1930.

Enkvist, N.E. “‘Theme Dynamics’ and Style: An Experiment.” Studia Anglia Posnaniensa 5 (1973): 127-35.

Fabb, Nigel.  Sentence Structure.  New York:  Routledge, 1994.

Fahnestock, Jeanne. Rhetorical Style: The Uses of Language in Persuasion. Oxford UP, 2011.

Fahnestock, Jeanne.  “Semantic and Lexical Coherence.”  College Composition and Communication 34 (1983):  400-416.

Faigley, Lester L.  “Generative Rhetoric as a Way of Increasing Syntactic Fluency.”  College Composition and Communication 30 (1979):  176-181.

Faigley, Lester.  “Names in Search of a Concept:  Maturity, Fluency, Complexity, and Growth in Written Syntax.”  College Composition and Communication:  291-299.

Faigley, Lester. Rev. of Linguistics, Stylistics, and the Teaching of Composition, ed. Donald McQuade. College Composition and Communication 33 (1982): 96-7.

Fairclough, Norman. Discourse and Social Change. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1992.

Fakundiny, Lydia.  “Untangling Problems of Terminology.”  Cornell University, 27 July 1999.
Farmer, Frank. “On Style and Other Unremarkable Things.” Written Communication 22 (2005): 339-347.

Farrow, S.  “The Nature of Syntax and the Syntax of Nature.”  Language and Communication 14.2 (April 1994):  203-10.

Flannery, Kathryn T. The Emperor’s New Clothes: Literature, Literacy, and the Ideology of Style. Pittsburgh: U Pittsburgh P, 1994.

Flannery, Kathryn T. “Style Redux.”  Refiguring Prose Style:  Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy.  Ed. T.R. Johnson and Tom Pace.  Logan:  Utah State UP, 2005.  57-75.

Fleckenstein, Kristie S.  “An Appetite for Coherence:  Arousing and Fulfilling Desires.”  College Composition and Communication 43 (1992):  81-87.

Fleischauer, John. “Teaching Prose Style Analysis.” Style 9 (1975): 92-102.

Flesch, Rudolf.  The Art of Plain Talk.  New York:  Harper & Row, 1962.

Flesch, Rudolf.  The Art of Readable Writing.  New York:  Harper & Row, 1949.

Fowler, Roger. Linguistic Criticism. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford UP, 1996.

Fowler, Roger. Literature as Social Discourse: The Practice of Linguistic Criticism. London: Batsford Academic, 1981.

Fowler, Roger. ” The New Stylistics.” Style and Structure in Literature: Essays in the New Stylistics. Ed. Roger Fowler. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1975. 1-18.

Fowler, Roger. “Studying Literature as Language.” Linguistics and the Study of Literature. Ed. T. D’Haen. Rodopi, Amsterdam, 1986. Rpt. The Stylistics Reader: From Roman Jakobson to the Present. Ed. Jean Jacques Weber. New York: St. Martin’s, 1996. 196-205.

Fowler, Roger. Style and Structure in Literature: Essays in the New Stylistics. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1975.

Fowler, Roger, R. Hodge, Gunther Kress, and T. Trew. Language and Control. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1979.

Freedman, Aviva.  “Sentence Combining:  Some Questions.”  Carleton Papers in Applied Language Studies 2 (1985):  17-32.

Freeman, Donald C. “‘According to My Bond’: King Lear and Re-Cognition.” Language and Literature 2 (1993): 1-18. Rpt. The Stylistics Reader: From Roman Jakobson to the Present. Ed. Jean Jacques Weber. New York: St. Martin’s, 1996. 280-98.

Fuller, Mary. “Teaching Style in Advanced Composition Classes.” Teaching Advanced Composition. Ed. Katherine H. Adams and John L. Adams. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1991. 119-132.

Gage, John T. “Philosophies of Style and Their Implications for Composition.” College English 42 (1980): 615-22.

Gaillet, Lynee Lewis. “Commonplace Books and the Teaching of Style.” Journal of Teaching Writing 15.2 (1996): 285-294.

Genette, Gérard. Figures III. 1972. Rpt. Narrative Discourse. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1980.

Genung, John Franklin. Handbook of Rhetorical Analysis; Studies in Style and Invention, Designed to Accompany the Author’s Practical Elements of Rhetoric. Boston: Ginn, 1891.

Genung, John Franklin. The Working Principles of Rhetoric. Boston: Ginn, 1901.

Gibson, Walker. Persona: A Style Study for Readers and Writers. New York: Random House, 1969.

Gibson, Walker. Tough, Sweet, and Stuffy: An Essay on Modern American Prose Styles. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1966.

Graves, Richard. “A Primer for Teaching Style.” College Composition and Communication 25 (1974): 186-90.

Greer, Russell, and Michael G. Moran.  “Francis Christensen.”  Twentieth-Century Rhetorics and Rhetoricians.  Michael G. Moran and Michelle Ballif, eds.  Westport, CT:  Greenwood, 2000.  90-94.

Hake, Rosemary, and Joseph M. Williams.  “Sentence Expanding:  Not Can, or How, but When.”  Sentence-Combining and the Teaching of Writing.  Donald A. Daiker, Andrew Kerek, and Max Morenberg.  Conway, AR:  L&S Books, 1979.  134-146.

Hake, Rosemary, and Joseph M. Williams.  “Some Cognitive Issues in Sentence Combining:  On the Theory that Smaller is Better.”  Sentence-Combining:  A Rhetorical Perspective.  Ed. Donald A. Daiker, Andrew Kerek, and Max Morenberg.  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 1985.  86-106.

Hake, Rosemary T., and Joseph M. Williams. “Style and Its Consequences: Do as I Do, Not as I Say.” College English 43 (1981): 433-451.

Halliday, M.A.K., and Ruqaiya K. Hasan.  Cohesion in English.  London:  Longman, 1976.

Halliday, M.A.K. “Linguistic Function and Literary Style: An Inquiry Into the Language of William Golding’s The Inheritors.” Literary Style: A Symposium. Ed. Seymour Chatman. 1971. Rpt. The Stylistics Reader: From Roman Jakobson to the Present. Ed. Jean Jacques Weber. New York: St. Martin’s, 1996. 56-87.

Halloran, S. Michael. “From Rhetoric to Composition: The Teaching of Writing in America to 1900.” A Short History of Writing Instruction. Ed. James J. Murphy. California: Hermagoras P, 1990. 151-82.

Harper, M. Todd.  “Teaching the Tropics of Inquiry in the Composition Classroom” Refiguring Prose Style:  Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy.  Ed. T.R. Johnson and Tom Pace.  Logan:  Utah State UP, 2005.  256-266.

Hart, Roderick. Modern Rhetorical Criticism. 2nd ed. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 1997.

Hartman, Geoffrey H. “The Fate of Reading Once More.” PMLA 111 (1996): 383-89.

Haswell, Richard H. “Dark Shadows: The Fate of Writers at the Bottom.” College Composition and Communication 39 (1988): 303-15.

Haswell, Richard H.  “Within-Group Distribution of Syntactic Growth Through Practice in Sentence-Combining.”  Research in the Teaching of English 15 (1981):  87-96.

Haynes, John. Introducing Stylistics. Boston: Unwin Hyman, 1989.

Haynes, John. Style. New York: Routledge, 1995.

Haynes-Burton, Cynthia.  “‘Hanging Your Alias on Their Scene’:  Writing Centers, Graffiti, and Style.”  The Writing Center Journal 14.2 (1994):  112-124.

Heath, M. “Longinus, On Sublimity 35.1.” Classical Quarterly 50.1 (2000).

Hebdige, Dick. Subculture: The Meaning of Style. New York: Routledge, 1981.

Herman, David. “Sciences of the Text.” Postmodern Culture 11.3 (May 2001). <http://jefferson.village.Virginia.EDU:80/pmc/current.issue/11.3herman.html>

Hermogenes of Tarsus. On Ideas of Style.

Hiatt, Mary P.  “The Feminine Style:  Theory and Fact.”  College Composition and Communication 27 (1978).  Rpt. Feminism and Composition:  A Critical Sourcebook. Ed. Gesa E. Kirsch, Faye Spencer Maor, Lance Massey, Lee Nickoson-Massey, and Mary P, Sheridan-Rabideau.  Boston:  Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2003.  43-48.

Hickey, Leo, ed. The Pragmatics of Style. Routledge, 1989.

Hillocks, George, Jr.  Research on Written Composition:  New  Directions for Teaching.  Urbana, IL:  NCTE, 1986.

Hillocks, George, Jr., and M.W. Smith.  “Grammar and Usage.”  Handbook of Research on Teaching the English Language Arts.  Eds. J. Flood, J.M. Jensen, D. Lapp, and J.R. Squire.  New York:  Macmillan, 1991.

Hirsch, E.D., Jr. The Philosophy of Composition. Chicago: U Chicago P, 1977.

Hodge, R., and Gunther Kress. Language as Ideology. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1979.

Holcomb, Chris. “Performative Stlistics and the Question of Academic Prose.” Rhetoric Review 24.2 (2005): 188-206.

Holcomb, Chris, and M. Jimmie Killingsworth. Performing Prose: The Study and Practice of Style in Composition. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2010.

Holloway, Dale.  “Semantic Grammars:  How They Can Help Us Teach Writing.”  College Composition and Communication 32 (1981):  205-218.

Holzman, Michael.  “Scientism and Sentence Combining.”  College Composition and Communication 34.1 (February 1983):  73-9.

Hoover, Eric.  “College Board Approves Major Changes Changes for the SAT.”  The Chronicle of Higher Education (28 June 2002).  <http://chronicle.com/daily/2002/06/2002062801n.htm>.

Horner, Bruce. “Mapping Errors and Expectations for Basic Writing: From ‘Frontier Field’ to ‘Border Country.'” English Education 16 (1994): 29-51.

Horning, Alice. “Readable Writing: The Role of Cohesion and Redundancy.” Journal of Advanced Composition 11.1 (Winter 1991): 135-46.

Howard, Rebecca Moore. “Contextual Stylistics:  Breaking Down the Binaries in Sentence-Level Pedagogy.”  Refiguring Prose Style:  Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy.  Ed. T.R. Johnson and Tom Pace.  Logan:  Utah State UP, 2005.  42-56.

Howard, Rebecca Moore. “Style, Race, Culture, Context.” Coming of Age: The Advanced Writing Curriculum. Ed. Linda K. Shamoon, Rebecca Moore Howard, Sandra Jamieson, and Robert A. Schwegler. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann Boynton/Cook, 2000. 94-105.

Howard, Rebecca Moore, Heidi Beierle, Patricia Tallakson, Amy Taggart, Dan Fredrick, Mark Noe, Artist Thornton, Kurt Schick, and Melanie Peterson. “What Are Styles and Why Are We Saying Such Terrific Things about Them? Teaching Writing:  Landmarks and Horizons.  Eds. Christina Russell McDonald and Robert L. McDonald.  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 2002.  214-228.

Hume, David. Of the Standard of Taste and Other Essays. Ed. and intro. John W. Lenz. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1965.
Hunt, Kellogg W.  “Anybody Can Teach English.”  Sentence-Combining and the Teaching of Writing.  Donald A. Daiker, Andrew Kerek, and Max Morenberg.  Conway, AR:  L&S Books, 1979.  149-156.

Hunt, Kendall.  “A Synopsis of Clause-to-Sentence Length Factors.”  English Journal 54 (1965):  300-309.

Hunt, Kendall.  “Early Blooming and Late Blooming Syntactic Structures.”  Evaluating Writing:  Describing, Measuring, Judging.  Eds. C.R. Cooper and Lee Odell.  Urbana, IL:  National Council of Teachers of English, 1977.

Hunt, Kendall.  Grammatical Structures Written at Three Grade Levels.  Urbana:  National Council of Teachers of English, 1965.

Hunt, Kendall.  “Improving Sentence Structure.”  English Journal 47 (1958):  206-211.

Hunt, Kendall.  “Recent Measures in Syntactic Development.”  Elementary English 43 (1966):  732-739.

Hunt, Kendall.  Syntactic Maturity in Schoolchildren and Adults.  U Chicago P, 1970.

Jackson, Brian, and Jon Ostenson. Style Academy. 2013.

Jakobson, Roman.  “Closing Statement:  Linguistics and Poetics.”  Style in Language.  Ed. T. Sebeok.  MIT P, 1980.  Rpt. The Stylistics Reader:  From Roman Jacobson to the Present.  Ed. Jean Jacques Weber.  New York:  St. Martin’s, 1996.  10-35.

Jakobson, Roman.  “Linguistics and Poetics.”  Style in Language.  Ed. Thomas A. Sebeok.  New York, 1960.  350-377.

Johnson, Sabina Thorne.  “Some Tentative Strictures on Generative Rhetoric.”  College English 31 (1969):  155-165.

Johnson, T.R., and Tom Pace, eds. Refiguring Prose Style:  Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy. Logan:  Utah State UP, 2005.

Johnson, T.R.  A Rhetoric of Pleasure:  Prose Style and Today’s Composition Classroom.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2003.

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I: The Meaning of Style (The Vagueness of Critical Terms, The Example of ‘Decadence’ analysed, Some Definitions of Style, Style as Idiosyncrasy, Style as Technique of Expression, Style Absolute, Separation of Meanings difficult in Practice, Confusions and Heresies that result, Style as Ornament, The Hypostatization of Style, Metaphor not Ornament, The Organic Nature of Style, True and False Idiosyncrasy, True and False Artificiality, True Idiosyncrasy may become False, The Case of Wordsworth, of Henry James). II: The Psychology of Style (The Writer’s Mode of Experience, Originating Emotion in Lyric Poetry, in Objective Literature, The Psychology of the Writer, Wordsworth’s Account, Subordinate Part of the Intellect, The Choice of Plot, Realism and Romanticism, Impossibility of defining a writer’s Mode of Experience, The Task of the Critic, Style can only be recognized from within, The Highest Style, Antony and Cleopatra, The Death-Scene analysed, The Crucial Metaphors, The Heresy of Coleridge, No antithesis between Personal and Impersonal Literature, Chaucer’s Troilus and Cressida). III: Poetry and Prose. IV: The Central Problem of Style (Recapitulation, Communication of Thought and Emotion, No Pure Thought in Literature, Communication of Emotion, The Creative Symbol, The Central Problem, Formulated by Stendhal, Expression and Definition, The Meaning of Selection, The Creation of Metaphor, Metaphor Necessary to Precision, Compulsive Style–Rhythmical devices, Dangers of Rhythmical Effects, The Pictorial Heresy, Crystallization, Plasticity, Style not dependent on Visualization, Sensuous Perception Necessary). V: The Process of Creative Style (Recapitulation, The Creation of the Symbol, The Psychology of Crystallization, Primary Crystallization, True Descriptive Style, and False, Crystallization and Plot, Planes of Crystallization, The Uniqueness of Shakespeare, Is this Conception of Style comprehensive?, The Victory over Language, Degeneration of Language, Shakespeare and Metaphor, The Lesson of Shakespeare, Shakespeare and Milton). VI: The English Bible; and the Grand Style (Prose and Poetry, The Psychology of Poetry, The Dangers of Poetic Prose, The Predisposition of the Audience, The Religious Predisposition, The English Bible, Creative and Non-Creative Styles in the Bible, Contemporary Predispositions, Rhetoric, The Styles of the Bible, Kinetic and Potential Language, The Dogma of the Authorized Version, Correctness of Language no Indication of Style, Shakespeare and Racine, What is the Grand Style?, A Means to Dramatic Propriety, Elizabethan Rhetoric distinct from the Grand Style, The Grand Style the Invention of Milton, Keats and Hyperion, Conclusion). Notes.
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 [1]“Style, Student Writing, and the Handbooks.”

 [2]Shaughnessy