Friday, April 20, 2018

Students as Authors


Bain, Justin.  “Students and Authors in Writing Centers.” Authorship in Composition Studies. Ed. Tracy Hamler Carrick and Rebecca Moore Howard. New York:  Wadsworth, 2006.

Barnard, Ian.  “Whole-Class Workshops:  The Transformation of Students into Writers.” Issues in Writing 12.2 (Spring/Summer 2002):  126-145.

Bartholomae, David.  “Inventing the University.”  When a Writer Can’t Write:  Studies in Writer’s Block and Other Composing Problems.  Ed. Mike Rose.  New York:  Guilford, 1985.  134-165.  Rpt. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory.  Ed. Victor Villanueva, Jr.  Urbana, IL:  National Council of Teachers of English, 1997.  589-620.

Bartholomae, David. “Writing with Teachers: A Conversation with Peter Elbow.” College Composition and Communication 46.1 (Feb. 1995): 62-71. Rpt. in Cross-Talk in Comp Theory: A Reader. Ed. Victor Villanueva. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English, 1997. 479-488. Print.

Bartlett, Robert C.  “Souls Without Longing.”  The Public Interest 150 (Winter 2003).

Berkenkotter, Carol.  “Student Writers and Their Sense of Authority over Texts.”  College Composition and Communication 35 (1984):  312-19.

Brandt, Deborah.  “A Nation of Authors.”  Teaching Academic Literacy:  The Uses of Teacher-Research in Developing a Writing Program.  Ed. Katherine L. Weese, Stephen L. Fox, and Stuart Greene.  Mahwah, NJ:  Lawrence Erlbaum, 1999.  195-200.

Brannon, Lil, and C.H. Knoblauch. “On Students’ Rights to Their Own Texts: A Model of Teacher Response.” College Composition and Communication 33 (1982): 157-66.

Carrick, Tracy Hamler, and Rebecca Moore Howard, eds. Authorship in Composition Studies. New York: Wadsworth, 2006.

Crosswhite, James.  “Authorship and Individuality:  Heideggerian Angles.”  Journal of Advanced Composition 12.1 (Winter 1992):  91-109.

Crowley, Sharon.  “writing and Writing.”  Writing and Reading Differently:  Deconstruction and the Teaching of Composition and Literature.  C. Douglas Atkins and Michael L. Johnson, eds.  Lawrence:  UP of Kansas, 1985.  93-100.

DeJoy, Nancy.  Undergraduate Student Writing in Composition Studies.  Logan:  Utah State UP, 2004.

Elbow, Peter.  “Being as Writer vs. Being an Academic:  A Conflict in Goals.”  College Composition and Communication 46 (1995):  72-83, 87-92.

Elbow, Peter.  “Inviting the Mother Tongue:  Beyond ‘Mistakes,’ ‘Bad English,’ and ‘Wrong Language.'”  JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory 19.3 (Summer 1999):  359-88.

French, Jana.  “The Dialogic Writing Conference:  Negotiating and Predicting the Role of Author.”  Teaching Academic Literacy:  The Uses of Teacher-Research in Developing a Writing Program.  Ed. Katherine L. Weese, Stephen L. Fox, and Stuart Greene.  Mahwah, NJ:  Lawrence Erlbaum, 1999.  135-148.

Fuller, Mary J., and Jean Ann Lutz.  “Constructing Authority: Student Responses and Classroom Discourse.” Discourse Studies in Composition.  Eds. Ellen L. Barton and Gail Stygall.  Cresskill, NJ:  Hampton P, 2002.

Gilfus, Jonna.  “Students and Authors in Introductory Composition Textbooks.” Authorship in Composition Studies. Ed. Tracy Hamler Carrick and Rebecca Moore Howard. New York:  Wadsworth, 2006.

Goodburn, Amy.  “The Ethics of Students’ Community Writing as Public Text.” Public Works: Student Writing as Public Text.  Ed. Emily J. Isaacs and Phoebe Jackson.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2001.

Greene, Stuart.  “Making Sense of My Own Ideas:  The Problems of Authorship in a Beginning Writing Classroom.”  Written Communication 12.2 (April 1995):  186-218.

Greene, Stuart, and Erin Smith.  “Teaching Talk about Writing:  Student Conflict in Acquiring a New Discourse of Authorship Through Collaborative Planning.”  Teaching Academic Literacy:  The Uses of Teacher-Research in Developing a Writing Program.  Ed. Katherine L. Weese, Stephen L. Fox, and Stuart Greene.  Mahwah, NJ:  Lawrence Erlbaum, 1999.  149-174.  [file Authorship:Pedagogy]

Guralnick, Elissa S.  “Breaking with Tradition:  Honors Composition for Gifted Seniors.”  Change (May/June 2001):  59-64.

Harris, Joseph. A Teaching Subject: Composition Since 1966. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1997.

Harris, Joseph.  “The Work of Others.”  College Composition and Communication 45.4 (December 1994):  439-441.

Haswell, Janis, Maureen Hourigan, and Lulu C.H. Sun.  “Affirming the Need for Continued Dialogue:  Refining an Ethic of Students and Student Writing in Composition Studies.”  Journal of Teaching Writing 18.1-2  (2000):  84-111.

Haswell, Janis, and Richard Haswell. Authoring: An Essay for the English Profession on Potentiality and Singularity. Logan: Utah State UP, 2010.

Helmers, Marguerite H.  Writing Students:  Composition Testimonials and Representations of Students.  Albany:  SUNY P, 1994.

Henderson, Alice, and Robert Barr. “Comparing Indicators of Authorial Stance in Psychology Students’ Writing and Published Research Articles.” Journal of Writing Research 2.2 (2010): 245-64.

Henry, Jim. “A Narratological Analysis of WAC Authorship.”  College English  56.7 (November 1994): 810-824.

Henry, Jim. “Teaching Technical Authorship.” Technical Communication Quarterly.  4.3 (Summer 1995): 245-259. 

Horner, Bruce.  “Students, Authorship, and the Work of Composition.”  College English 59.5 (September 1997):  505-29.

Isaacs, Emily J., and Phoebe Jackson, eds.  Public Works: Student Writing as Public Text.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2001.

Isaacs, Emily J., and Phoebe Jackson.  “What’s the Issue with Student Writing as Public Text?” Public Works: Student Writing as Public Text.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2001.

Lillis, Theresa M.  Student Writing:  Access, Regulation, Desire.  New York:  Routledge, 2001.

Lu, Min-Zhan.  “Professing Multiculturalism:  The Politics of Style in the Contact Zone.”  College Composition and Communication 45.4 (December 1994):  442-58.

Lunsford, Andrea A., Rebecca Rickly, Michael Salvo, and Susan West. What Matters Who Writes? What Matters Who Responds? Issues of Ownership in the Writing Classroom.” Kairos 1.1 (1996).

Mauriello, N., and G. Pagnucci.  “Can’t We Just Xerox This?” Public Works: Student Writing as Public Text.  Ed. Emily J. Isaacs and Phoebe Jackson.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2001.

Miller, Susan. “Composition as a Cultural Artifact: Rethinking History as Theory.” Writing Theory and Critical Theory. Ed. John Clifford and John Schilb. New York: Modern Language Association, 1994. 19-32.

Miller, Susan.  Textual Carnivals:  The Politics of Composition.  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 1991.

Moffett, James.  Teaching the Universe of Discourse.  Boston:  Houghton Mifflin, 1968.

Moran, C.  “Publishing Student Writing.” Public Works: Student Writing as Public Text.  Ed. Emily J. Isaacs and Phoebe Jackson.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2001.

Olson, Jon, Dawn J. Moyer, and Adelia Falda.  “Student-Centered Assessment Research in the Writing Center.”  Writing Center Research:  Extending the Conversation.  Ed. Paula Gillespie, Alice Gillam, Lady Falls Brown, and Byron Stay. Mahwah, NJ:  Lawrence Erlbaum, 2002.  111-132.

Penrose, Ann M., and Cheryl Geisler.  “Reading and Writing Without Authority.”  College Composition and Communication 45.4 (December 1994):  505-520.

Ritter, Kelly. Who Owns School? Authority, Students, and Online Discourse. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton, 2010.

Robillard, Amy E. Reimagining Students’ Writerly Authority:  Co-Investigation and Representations of Student Writers in Composition Studies.  Diss. Syracuse University, 2004.

Robillard, Amy E. “Students and Authors in Composition Scholarship.” Authorship in Composition Studies. Ed. Tracy Hamler Carrick and Rebecca Moore Howard. New York: Wadsworth, 2006. 41-56.

Robillard, Amy E. “Young Scholars Affecting Composition: A Challenge to Disciplinary Citation Practices.” College English 68.3 (January 2006): 253-270.

Schreiner, Steven. “A Portrait of the Student as a Young Writer: Re-evaluating Emig and the Process Movement.” College Composition and Communication 48.1 (February 1997): 86-104.

Silber, Patricia. “Teaching Written English as a Second Language.” College Composition and Communication 30.3 (1979):  296-300.

Slevin, James F.  “Disciplining Students:  Whom Should Composition Teach and What Should They Know?”  Composition in the Twenty-First Century:  Crisis and Change.  Ed. Lynn Z. Bloom, Donald A. Daiker, and Edward M. White.  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 1996.  153-65.

Sommers, Nancy. “Responding to Student Writing.” College Composition and Communication 33 (1982): 148-56.

Spellmeyer, Kurt.  “Inventing the University Student.”  Composition in the Twenty-First Century:  Crisis and Change.  Ed. Lynn Z. Bloom, Donald A. Daiker, and Edward M. White.  Carbondale:  Southern Illinois UP, 1996.  39-46.

Spigelman, Candace.  Across Property Lines:  Textual Ownership in Writing Groups.  Urbana, IL:  National Council of Teachers of English, 2000.

Stover, A.  “Redefining Public/Private Boundaries in the Composition Classroom.” Public Works: Student Writing as Public Text.  Ed. Emily J. Isaacs and Phoebe Jackson.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2001.

Warnock, Tilly, and John Warnock.  “Liberatory Writing Centers:  Restoring Authority to Writers.”  Writing Centers:  Theory and Administration.  Ed. Gary A. Olson.  Urbana, IL:  NCTE, 1984.  16-23.

Yancey, Kathleen Blake.  “Postmodernism, Palimpsest, and Portfolios:  Theoretical Issues in the Representation of Student Work.”  College Composition and Communication 55.4 (June 2004):  738-761.