Thursday, July 19, 2018

Native American Languages, Discourses, and Rhetorics


Allen, Paula Gunn.  “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Press.” Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies 23.2 (2002):  3-6.

Basso, K.H.  “‘To Give Up on Words’:  Silence in Western Apache Culture.”  Southwestern Journal of Anthropology (Autumn 1970).

Bataille, Gretchen M., and Kathleen Mullen Sands.  American Indian Women:  Telling Their Lives.  1984.

Benally, AnCita, and T.L. McCarty.  “The Navaho Language Today.”  Perspectives on Official English.  Ed. Karen L., Adams and Daniel T. Brink.  237-46.

Bennett, J.A.H., and J.W. Berry.  “The Future of Cree Syllabic Literacy in Northern Canada.”  The Future of Literacy in a Changing World.  Ed. Daniel A. Wagner.  Rev. ed.  Cresskill, NJ:  Hampden P, 1999.  271-290.

Bizzaro, Resa Crane.  “Shooting Our Last Arrow:  Developing a Rhetoric of Identity for Unenrolled American Indians.”  College English 67.1 (Sept. 2004):  61-74.

Bosmajian, Haig A.  “Defining the ‘American Indian’:  A Case Study in the Language of Suppression.”  The Speech Teacher (March 1973).

Bright, William.  American Indian Linguistics and Literature.  New York:  Mouton de Gruyter, 1984.

Brown, M.F. Who Owns Native Culture? Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2003.

Brown, Rexford G.  Schools of Thought:  How the Politics of Literacy Shape Thinking in the Classroom.  San Francisco:  Jossey-Bass, 1991.

Brown, Stephen Gilbert.  Words in the Wilderness:  Critical Literacy in the Borderlands.  Albany:  State U of New York P, 2000.

Brown, Thomas. “Did the U.S. Army Distribute Smallpox Blankets to Indians? Fab rication and Falsification in Ward Churchill’s Genocide Rhetoric.” Plagiary 1.9 (2006): 1-30.

Carr, Tom.  “Varieties of the ‘Other’:  Voice and Native American Culture.”  Voices on Voice: Definitions, Perspectives, Inquiry.  Ed. Kathleen Blake Yancey.  Urbana, IL:  National Council of Teachers of English, 1994.  191-201.

Cullum, Linda.  “Lessons from the Turtle Grandparents:  American Indian Literature and the Teaching of Writing.” Rhetoric and Ethnicity. Ed. Keith Gilyard and Vorris Nunley.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2004.  143-151.

Cushman Ellen. “Toward a Praxis of New Media: The Allotment Period in Cherokee History.” Reflections 5.1-2 (Spring 2006): 111-132.

Cutler, Charles L.  O Brave New Words!  Native American Loanwords in Current English.  Norman, OK:  U of Oklahoma P.

DePasquale, Paul W.  “White Indian Up Front:  Building Learning Communities in the ‘Postcolonial’/Indigenized Classroom.”  Conflicts and Crises in the Composition ClassroomÑand What Instructors Can Do About Them.  Ed. Dawn Skorczewski and Matthew Parfitt.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2003.  41-50.

Dumont, Robert V., Jr.  “Learning English and How to be Silent:  Studies in Sioux and Cherokee Classrooms.”  Functions of Language in the Classroom.  Ed. Courtney B. Cazden, Vera P. John, and Dell Hymes.  New York:  Teachers College, Columbia U, 1972.  344-69.

Engels, Jeremy. “‘Equipped for Murder’: The Paxton Boys and ‘the Spirit of Killing all Indians’ in Pennsylvania, 1763-1764.” Rhetoric and Public Affairs 8.3 (Fall 2005).

Enoch, Jessica.  “Resisting the Script of Indian Education:  Zitkala Sa and the Carlisle Indian School.”  College English 65.2 (November 2002):  117-141.

Enoch, Jessica.  “‘Semblances of Civilization’:  Zitkala Sa’s Resistance to White Education.” Rhetoric and Ethnicity. Ed. Keith Gilyard and Vorris Nunley.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2004.  24-36.

Freedman, Monroe H., and Eric M. Freedman, eds.  Group Defamation and Freedom of Speech.  Westport:  Greenwood Press, 1995.

Grijalva, Michelle.  “Teaching American Indian Students:  Interpreting the Rhetorics of Silence.”  Writing in Multicultural Settings.  Ed. Carol Severino, Juan C. Guerra, and Johnnella E. Butler.  New York:  MLA, 1997.  40-50.

Hill, Ruth Beebe.  Hanta Yo:  An American Saga.  1979.

Hymes, Dell.  “In Vain I Tried to Tell You”:  Essays in Native American Ethnopoetics.  Philadelphia:  U of Pennsylvania P, 1981.

John, Vera P.  “Styles of LearningÑStyles of Teaching:  Reflections on the Education of Navajo Children.”  Functions of Language in the Classroom.  Ed. Courtney B. Cazden, Vera P. John, and Dell Hymes.  New York:  Teachers College, Columbia U, 1972.  331-43.

Krupat, Arnold, Ed.  New Voices in Native American Literary Criticism.  Smithsonian Institution P, 1993.

Leap, William L.  “American Indian English and Its Implications for Bilingual Education.”  Linguistics for Teachers.  Eds. Linda Miller Cleary and Michael D. Linn.  New York:  McGraw-Hill, 1993.  207-218.

Leap, William L.  American Indian English.  U Utah P.

Leap, William L.  “American Indian Languages.”  Language in the USA.  Ed. Charles Ferguson and Shirley Brice Heath.  116-44.

Lyons, Scott Richard.  “Rhetorical Sovereignty:  What Do American Indians Want from Writing?”  College Composition and Communication 51.3 (February 2000):  447-468.

Medicine, Bea.  “The Role of American Indian Women in Cultural Continuity and Transition.”  Women and Language in Transition.  Ed. Joyce Penfield.  Albany:  SUNY P, 1987.  159-66.

Miranda, Deborah A.  “‘A String of Textbooks’: Artifacts of Composition Pedagogy in Indian Boarding Schools.”  Journal of Teaching Writing 16.2 (2000): 213-32.

Ostman.  Communication and Indian Agriculture.  Thousand Oaks, CA:  Sage, 1989.

Philips, Susan U.  “Participant Structures and Communicative Competence:  Warm Springs Children in Community and Classroom.”  Functions of Language in the Classroom.  Ed. Courtney B. Cazden, Vera P. John, and Dell Hymes.  New York:  Teachers College, Columbia U, 1972.  370-94.

Philips, Susan Urmston.  The Invisible Culture:  Communication in the Classroom and Community on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation.  New York:  Longman, 1983.

Powell, Malea.  “Down by the River, or How Susan La Flesche Picotte Can Teach Us about Alliance as a Practice of Survivance.”  College English 67.1 (Sept. 2004):  38-60.

Powell, Malea.  “Extending the Hand of Empire:  American Indians and the Indian Reform Movement, a Beginning.” Rhetoric and Ethnicity. Ed. Keith Gilyard and Vorris Nunley.  Portsmouth, NH:  Boynton/Cook, 2004.  37-45.

Powell, Malea.  “Rhetorics of Survivance:  How American Indians Use Writing.”  College Composition and Communication 53:3 (February 2002):  396-434.

Redfield, Karen A.  “Opening the Composition Classroom to Storytelling:  Respecting Native American Students’ Use of Rhetorical Strategies.”  Perspectives on Written Argument.  Ed. Deborah P. Berrill.  Cresskill, NJ:  Hampton, 1996.

Revard, Carter, ed.  Native Heritage:  American Indian Literature.  Urbana, IL:  National Council of Teachers of English, 1993.

Sarris, Greg.  Keeping Slug Woman Alive:  A Holistic Approach to American Indian Texts.  Berkeley:  U California P, 1993.

Shipley, William, ed.  In Honor of Mary Haas:  From the Haas Festival Conference on Native American Linguistics.  New York:  Mouton de Gruyter, 1988.

Taylor, Donald M., et al.  “Language Perceptions among the Inuit of Arctic Quebec.”  Journal of Language and Social Psychology 12.3 (September 1993).

Tonouchi, Lee A.  “Da State of Pidgin Address.”  College English 67.1 (Sept. 2004):  75-82.

Warkentin, Germaine. “In Search of “The Word of the Other”: Aboriginal Sign Systems and the History of the Book in Canada.” Book History 2 (1999).

Wauters, Joan K., Janet M. Bruce, David R. Black, and Phillip N. Hocker.  “Learning Styles:  A Study of Alaska Native and Non-Native Students.”  Journal of American Indian Education (Special Issue, August 1989):  53-62.

Wieder, D.L., and S. Pratt.  “On Being a Recognizable Indian among Indians.”  Cultural Communication and Interculltural Contact.  Ed. D. Carbaugh.  Hillsdale, NJ:  Lawrence Erlbaum, 1990.  45-64.

Wieder, D.L., and S. Pratt.  “On the Occasioned and Situated Character of Members’ Questions and Answers:  Reflections on the Question, ‘Is He or She a Real Indian?'”  Cultural Communication and Interculltural Contact.  Ed. D. Carbaugh.  Hillsdale, NJ:  Lawrence Erlbaum, 1990.  65-75.

Yagelski, Robert.  “A Rhetoric of Contact:  Tecumseh and the Native American Confederacy.”  Rhetoric Review 14.1 (Fall 1995):  64-77.

Young, Morris.  “Native Claims:  Cultural Citizenship, Ethnic Expressions, and the Rhetorics of ‘Hawaiianness.'”  College English 67.1 (Sept. 2004):  83-101.

Zepeda, Ofelia.  “American Indian Language Policy.”  Perspectives on Official English.  Ed. Karen L. Adams and Daniel T. Brink.  247-58.